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Report Praises Arlington County for Improved Counterrorism Efforts

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By Jonathan Wilson

A U.S. Justice Department report commends police in Arlington County, Virginia for improving counterrorism training and policies since the September 11 attacks.

The National Institute of Justice commissioned the study to help establish a set of best practices for agencies responding to incidents like September 11.

The report says Arlington County has significantly stepped up its critical incident training -- which now covers active-shooter situations, hazardous materials and terrorism.

It also says Arlington police have developed better intelligence coordination, along with improved cooperation with local hospitals, schools, and the county health department.

But the report reveals that some officers say the heightened state of alert in effect since 9/11 is creating "stress and frustration'' among department members.

Some officers also tell researchers that keeping emergency services on high-alert also "tries their patience."


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