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Nine-Year-Old Finds Fossil In Dino Park

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By Natalie Neumann

A nine-year-old girl from Virginia found a fossil at a dinosaur park near Laurel, Maryland and the bone is going to the Smithsonian Institution.

The park has only been open to people who want to go digging for dinosaur bones for two weeks, but there's already been a potentially significant find. While visiting with her parents and younger sister, Gabrielle Block of Annandale, Virginia found what's thought to be the vertebra from a raptor's tail.

Geologist Peter Kranz is directing the program for the Prince George's County Department of Parks and Recreation. He tells the Baltimore Sun more than 40 people showed up during the last dig.

The Smithsonian's experts keep all significant fossil finds for analysis. The park is open to the public from noon to 4 p.m. every other Saturday.

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