Metro To Pay $200,000 For Clean Water Act Violation | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Metro To Pay $200,000 For Clean Water Act Violation

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Metro faces a $200,000 fine for violating the Clean Water Act six years ago.
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Metro faces a $200,000 fine for violating the Clean Water Act six years ago.

By Rebecca Blatt

Metro will pay a $200,000 fine to settle a six-year-old Clean Water Act violation.

A department of justice release says Metro pleaded guilty to the negligent discharge of hydrofluoric acid to the pipes and sewers of the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission, the authority that provides water for customers in Maryland's Montgomery and Prince George's County.

The dump took place over several days in 2003. It came from the Branch Avenue rail car washing facility in Maryland. Metro says it has since reconfigured its rail car washing operation to ensure compliance with the Clean Water Act.

The agency will be subject to an 18-month probationary period and quarterly monitoring of its facility.

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