New Shuttle Aims to Help Tysons Avoid Midday Rush Hour | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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New Shuttle Aims to Help Tysons Avoid Midday Rush Hour

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By Jonathan Wilson

Congested roads have long been a part of life in Tyson's Corner, Virginia -- and things could get even worse as construction on the Dulles Metrorail project ramps up.

A new, free shuttle service may help.

The shuttle is launching just in time for the holidays it will continue year-round on weekdays from 10 am to 2:30 pm.

Richard Forbes and Star Hunter, both shopping on Monday, say the midday service could make a difference.

"Yeah, sure, it makes a lot of sense," Forbes says.

"Its long overdue," Hunter says.

The shuttle isn't just for shoppers many of its stops are in front of major local employers such as Freddie Mac and Gannett.

Ellen Kamilakis, with Fairfax County's Transportation Department, urges people to use the connector and help Tyson's avoid a third rush hour in the middle of the day.

"Get on the bus it's free, it's every ten minutes," she says. "Run your errands, don't lose your parking spots and don't add another car to the road."

The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority and the Dulles Metrorail Project are splitting its $1.1 million annual operating cost.

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