D.C. Food Charity Reaches Out to Military Families | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Food Charity Reaches Out to Military Families

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By Mana Rabiee

A local food charity that normally helps needy people is reaching out to military families for the first time this holiday season.

At the Washington Navy Yard in Southeast D.C., young Naval Sea Cadets learn drills from a junior instructor.

Nearby, Commander Jospeh Cirone oversees the unloading of large food boxes destined for the Thanksgiving tables of military families.

"Ensign Levoi, you and Fondino take both of our vans. We're gonna load the coast guards' baskets into our vehicles," orders Cirone.

It's all part of Project Giveback, a local food charity that normally helps feed needy families during holidays. This year they also reached out to 125 military families -- 25 from each branch of the armed forces.

"Charity organizations tend to think that the military people are taken care of by the military."

Retired marine Edgar Jimenez is also a Project Giveback board member. He says military families often feel "over looked" by charity groups.

"In a lot of cases the military tries to work with them but is unable to meet a lot of their needs so charity organizations really need to reach out to them, now more than ever," says Jimenez.

The baskets contained enough food staples to last a family at least a week.

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