: News

Filed Under:

AU Study Suggests Transcendental Meditation As Rx For Stress

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

The American College Health Association reports 50 percent of college students feel overwhelming anxiety. A new study at American University suggests a certain kind of meditation might help.

Brittany Gada is only a freshman at AU, but she's no stranger to stress. "During midterms I ended up working five days and covering for someone else and I had two papers and three midterms in the same week," says Gada.

As AU psychology professor Dave Haaga explains, "It's an age group experiencing a lot of new stresses as far as how to manage their time, make choices when everything isn't as structured as much as it is in high school."

Haaga and a team from Iowa's Maharishi University of Management studied 300 AU students. Half learned transcendental meditation, focusing on a sound or mantra, twice a day. Half did not. After three months, the TM group showed less anxiety, even lower blood pressure.

Brittany Gada says she would try TM. The only catch? "I would definitely have to make time for it!" she says.

And for an international-relations major and French-and-Arabic minor juggling two part-time jobs, that's no small feat.

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
NPR

How Is The Democratic Convention Playing In Deep-Blue Massachusetts?

Not every liberal voter had been eyeing the upcoming Democratic National Convention with uniform eagerness. NPR's Tovia Smith looks at how Democrats far from the convention floor are viewing the week.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.