Child Care Costs Skyrocket For Several D.C. Families After Budget Cuts | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Child Care Costs Skyrocket For Several D.C. Families After Budget Cuts

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Parents protest cuts in child care subsidies outside of the Wilson building in Washington, D.C.
Kavitha Cardoza
Parents protest cuts in child care subsidies outside of the Wilson building in Washington, D.C.

By Kavitha Cardoza

Outside the Wilson Building in D.C., dozens of little children carried signs that read "I'm three, don't forget about me." They and their parents were protesting cuts in child care subsidies.

The city has cut millions of dollars from the Child Care Subsidy program, which provides vouchers for eligible low income families to offset costs.

Fahim Shabazz says he has a four and five year old who attend St. Philip's Child Care Center in South East D.C. He says his costs jumped from less than 10 dollars a week to more than 110 dollars for each child. And Shabazz says he doesn't know what to do.

"Should the day care bills be paid or should the house bills be paid? Now I say the child care is more important than my bills. I'm looking at being evicted, lights being cut off, not eating any food," Shabazz says.

Parents at the rally say they aren't sure how long they'll be able to keep paying the increased child-care costs.

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