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Adoption Brings Hope In Montgomery County MD

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

It's national adoption month, and Maryland's Montgomery County opened its courthouse to the public as 22 children were adopted.

Three-year-old Joshua Williams banged the gavel himself as he and his adoptive mother Dietrice Williams officially became a family.

Twenty two children became brothers, sisters, daughters and sons today in Rockville. Yvonne and Melvin Jacobs adopted little Shayla who is four-years-old, and even littler Dante who is three-years-old. Jacobs couldn't be more proud. "I tell you it's the greatest thing I ever did, these babies to come into my heart are the greatest things that could happen to me," says Jacobs.

Some of the children in the courtroom were abandoned as infants. Others are teenagers who fled abusive homes. "The kids that are in our system have been abused or neglected and they were removed from their parents," says Catherine Robinson, supervisor of Adoption for Montgomery County.

That means it takes a special kind of family to adopt. "Clearly they need to have a lot of patience and love for these children, and fortunately, they do," says Agnes Leshner, head of child welfare services for the county.

There are more than 500 children in foster care in Montgomery County. The county expects 55 will get adopted.

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