"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, November 19, 2009 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, November 19, 2009

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(November 19) ICE! There's plenty of bling at ICE! during Christmas on the Potomac at National Harbor in Prince George's County, Maryland, opening tonight and chilling visitors through January 10th. Two million pounds of the frozen stuff have been chiseled into towering topiaries and cozy igloos. Break out the winter wardrobe and expect flurries of visitors.

(November 20 & 21) BALLROOM WITH A TWIST Ballroom with a Twist lets you live it up in Maryland at The Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda tomorrow and Saturday nights. Familiar faces from television's top rated dance shows "So You Think You Can Dance", "American Idol" and "Dancing With the Stars" whip each other around the dance floor and serenade the night away.

(November 20) STEEL HAMMER Paying homage to Appalachia's myths and music, Trio Mediaeval is joined by the Bang on a Can All-Stars at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, Maryland, tomorrow night at 8. The show recreates the legend of John Henry)>) as part of the Steel Hammer Engagement Project, using the rich musical tapestry of Appalachia's mountain dulcimers, wood bones and banjoes.

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