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Advertising Industry Objects To Moran's Obesity Bill

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Virginia Congressman Jim Moran's bill calls for the federal government to decide which foods and beverages can be labeled as healthy and acceptable for children.
Sara Sciammacco
Virginia Congressman Jim Moran's bill calls for the federal government to decide which foods and beverages can be labeled as healthy and acceptable for children.

By Sara Sciammacco

Virginia Congressman Jim Moran has introduced a bill to combat obesity among kids. But some in the advertising industry say it goes too far.

Moran's bill lets the federal government regulate the advertising and marketing of food and beverages to children. Obesity numbers in Virginia aren't as bad as other states, with 23 percent of the population obese. Still, Moran says the problem is national and the government needs to step in.

"Children are very susceptible to commercials that advertise snack food and sugar pop and they are influenced by them and they tell their parents to buy them and their parents, if they don't know any better, do buy them and even sell them through some of the school systems," says Moran.

Under Moran's bill, the government decides which foods and beverages can be labeled as healthy and acceptable to children. It limits exposure of those that are not deemed nutritional. An executive for the Association of National Advertisers says the bill will likely violate the First Amendment.

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