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Sir Paul McCartney In Line For Prize

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Paul McCartney performs the Beatles' classic "Blackbird" during his special BBC Electric Proms performance at the Roundhouse venue in London.
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Paul McCartney performs the Beatles' classic "Blackbird" during his special BBC Electric Proms performance at the Roundhouse venue in London.

By Bill Redlin

Sir Paul McCartney is returning to Washington next year. The former Beatle is going to receive the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song from the Library of Congress. An all-star tribute concert will also be staged in his honor in the spring of 2010, although the library has not announced who will be taking part.

The 67-year-old music legend recently completed a five-week summer tour of the United States, and a stop in Washington was included. James Billington of the Library of Congress says it's hard to think of another performer and composer who has had a more transformative effect than the lad from Liverpool.

Stevie Wonder and Paul Simon won the first two Gershwin prizes. The library houses the manuscripts of the songwriting duet George and Ira Gershwin.

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