: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Group Releases How-To Manual For Truce Between Rival Gangs

Play associated audio

By Mana Rabiee

A group in D.C. that's helped young people leave the world of inner-city violence has published a manual with the A-B-C's of how to negotiate a truce between rival gangs. For 20 years, the Alliance of Concerned Men has helped young people in the DC area pull themselves out of local gangs.

Tyrone Parker founded the Alliance, based in the Columbia heights neighborhood of Northwest D.C.

"It started 15 years ago when we first began to understand we were putting together a road map, a road map for peace," says Parker.

The new guide offers common sense recommendations like brining a mediator to the truce who doesn't carry 'bad blood' for either side.

Nineteen year-old Ivan Cloyd used to hang out in gangs but now mentors younger kids for the Alliance.

"The low point for me was to see a lot of my friends get killed and realizing that I'm a part of something that was destroying my community," Cloyd says.

Parker says a truce is usually formalized with hand shakes among the gang leaders who are then encouraged to spread the peace to other members.

NPR

Comic-Con Fans Continue The Epic Battle Between Science And Fiction

Fans of science fiction have long wrestled with the question of just how much science should be in their fiction. Advocates of different approaches met at San Diego's Comic-Con.
NPR

Scraped, Splattered — But Silent No More. Finally, The Dinner Plate Gets Its Say

Instagram is the Internet's semi-obsessive, borderline-creepy love letter to food. But behind every great meal is a plate doing a pretty-OK job. So a comedian made an Instagram to celebrate plates.
NPR

Leaked Democratic Party Emails Show Members Tried To Undercut Sanders

Just days before the Democratic National Committee convention gets underway, WikiLeaks releases almost 20,000 emails among DNC staff, revealing discussions of topics from Bernie Sanders to the media.
NPR

Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

Few people can demand what kind of electricity they get. But Microsoft and Facebook, which operate huge, power-hungry data centers, are trying to green up the electricity grid with their buying power.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.