NTSB: February Hearing Won't Slow Metro Crash Investigation | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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NTSB: February Hearing Won't Slow Metro Crash Investigation

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By Jonathan Wilson

The National Transportation Safety Board plans to hold a public hearing regarding the June 22nd Metrorail crash. The hearing is set for February 23rd and 24th. The NTSB says it will focus on Metro's actions to address safety issues, and oversight of the entire Metro system.

Robert Sumwalt, a member of the NTSB who will chair the hearing says it will not be a forum for public comment, but rather a chance for the board to get sworn testimony from witnesses in front of a public audience.

Sumwalt says the NTSB would like to hold the hearing sooner, but a dozen other rail crash investigations make that impossible.

"Our goal is still to be able finish the entire investigation by the anniversary date of the accident," Sumwalt says.

Sumwalt says the hearing may continue into a third day. The June 22nd Red Line crash was the worst in Metro's history. Nine people were killed and dozens were injured.

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