"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, November 12, 2009 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, November 12, 2009

Play associated audio

By Stephanie Kaye

(November 15) IF I CAN'T DANCE Parkinson's disease plays a part in a new production by Bowen McCauley Dance on the Kennedy Center's Millenium Stage Sunday at 6 p.m. "If I Can't Dance" rounds out a trio of premiere performances by professionals and youth. It features dancers living with Parkinson's disease who are part of the group's Dance for PD program.

(November 12-15) YOU BETTER SHOP AROUND After traipsing past untouchable artifacts in galleries and museums, you've now got an opportunity to take something home. The 20th annual Museum Shop Around kicks off today at The Mansion at Strathmore in Rockville, Maryland and runs through Sunday. From Degas' ballerinas to stuffed replicas of Bo the First Dog and Lincoln's presidential china, local museums offer some artistic and inspired shopping.

(November 13) AM I TOO LOUD? The University of Maryland School of Music presents Am I Too Loud?, a concert at The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, Maryland, Friday night at 8 p.m. The show tips its hat to piano-playing accompanists everywhere, paying homage to collaboration with Britten's Cabaret Songs and Schubert's fishy "Trout" Quintet.

NPR

'One Of Us' Examines The Damaged Inner Terrain Of Norwegian Mass Shooter

Journalist Asne Seierstad chronicles the 2011 shooting massacre in her country in her latest book. Critic Maureen Corrigan calls the work "engrossing, important and undeniably difficult to read."
NPR

Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago

People have been farming — and eating — a GMO for thousands of years without knowing it. Scientists have found genes from bacteria in sweet potatoes around the world. So who made the GMO?
NPR

Obama Laces Up To Tout Asian Trade Deal At Nike

The president says he's pushing for the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership in part to boost "Made in the U.S.A." products around the world. So why make the pitch at Nike?
NPR

As Emoji Spread Beyond Texts, Many Remain [Confounded Face] [Interrobang]

There's a growing tendency to bring the tiny hieroglyphs off of phones, but not everyone is fluent. New takes on emoji integration suggest misunderstanding may be remedied with universal translation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.