"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, November 12, 2009 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, November 12, 2009

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By Stephanie Kaye

(November 15) IF I CAN'T DANCE Parkinson's disease plays a part in a new production by Bowen McCauley Dance on the Kennedy Center's Millenium Stage Sunday at 6 p.m. "If I Can't Dance" rounds out a trio of premiere performances by professionals and youth. It features dancers living with Parkinson's disease who are part of the group's Dance for PD program.

(November 12-15) YOU BETTER SHOP AROUND After traipsing past untouchable artifacts in galleries and museums, you've now got an opportunity to take something home. The 20th annual Museum Shop Around kicks off today at The Mansion at Strathmore in Rockville, Maryland and runs through Sunday. From Degas' ballerinas to stuffed replicas of Bo the First Dog and Lincoln's presidential china, local museums offer some artistic and inspired shopping.

(November 13) AM I TOO LOUD? The University of Maryland School of Music presents Am I Too Loud?, a concert at The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, Maryland, Friday night at 8 p.m. The show tips its hat to piano-playing accompanists everywhere, paying homage to collaboration with Britten's Cabaret Songs and Schubert's fishy "Trout" Quintet.

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