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Maryland Advocacy Group Files Suit Against Frederick County Police

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By Elliott Francis

A local Latino advocacy group is suing Frederick county police, accusing them of racial profiling.

The complaint was filed in U.S. district court by Casa de Maryland. "We filed suit here in Greenbelt on behalf of Roxana Arianna against the Frederick county commissioners, Sheriff Jenkins, two of the deputies, and some former ICE agents," says John Hayes, lead attorney.

The suit claims two Frederick county deputies interrogated Arianna, who is originally from Salvador, about her immigration status as she ate lunch in a local park in Frederick. Then, they detained and transferred her to federal authorities on suspicion of immigration violation.

It adds, county police violated an agreement which only allows them to question the immigration status of someone arrested for other offenses. Kari O'Brian, an attorney with Casa de Maryland, says Frederick county Sheriff Charles Jenkins bears the responsibility for the action.

"We believe he has a political agenda around immigration that belongs as a federal matter. And local sheriffs have no business getting involved in this," says O'Brian.

Sheriff Jenkins refused comment until he's had the opportunity to the review the complaint.

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