Maryland And D.C. Receive 'F' For Removing Bad Teachers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland And D.C. Receive 'F' For Removing Bad Teachers

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By Kavitha Cardoza

A report card called Leaders and Laggards, which grades states based on education innovation, gives Virginia top marks for removing ineffective teachers from the classroom while Maryland and D.C. get a failing grade.

The report card doesn't look at academic successes of today. Rather, it focuses on what states are doing to prepare for challenges that lie ahead, saying there cannot be achievement in the long run without innovation.

Maryland is tied with D.C. for an F grade when it comes to removing ineffective teachers. Approximately 75 percent of principals say teacher's unions are a barrier.

Arthur Rothkopf with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce helped write the report. "We're not saying there should be mass firings, but if you can't deal with teachers who are not improving performance of students then it's clear innovation will not take place," says Rothkopof.

Rothkopf says D.C.'s Chancellor Michelle Rhee has not been here long enough for her practices to be reflected in the data. Maryland, Virginia and D.C. all receive a B grade for how they hire and evaluate teachers.

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