Maryland And D.C. Receive 'F' For Removing Bad Teachers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Maryland And D.C. Receive 'F' For Removing Bad Teachers

Play associated audio

By Kavitha Cardoza

A report card called Leaders and Laggards, which grades states based on education innovation, gives Virginia top marks for removing ineffective teachers from the classroom while Maryland and D.C. get a failing grade.

The report card doesn't look at academic successes of today. Rather, it focuses on what states are doing to prepare for challenges that lie ahead, saying there cannot be achievement in the long run without innovation.

Maryland is tied with D.C. for an F grade when it comes to removing ineffective teachers. Approximately 75 percent of principals say teacher's unions are a barrier.

Arthur Rothkopf with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce helped write the report. "We're not saying there should be mass firings, but if you can't deal with teachers who are not improving performance of students then it's clear innovation will not take place," says Rothkopof.

Rothkopf says D.C.'s Chancellor Michelle Rhee has not been here long enough for her practices to be reflected in the data. Maryland, Virginia and D.C. all receive a B grade for how they hire and evaluate teachers.

NPR

Book Review: 'The Uses Of The Body,' Deborah Landau

Poet Tess Taylor reviews The Uses of the Body by Deborah Landau.
NPR

Do Organic Farmers Need Special Seeds And Money To Breed Them?

Organic farmers say they need crop varieties that were bred specifically for conditions on their farms. Clif Bar & Company decided to back their cause with up to $10 million in grants.
NPR

So Far, So Good For The Economy. But What About The Second Half?

The Labor Department's June report showed decent job growth, with unemployment dipping to 5.3 percent. In fact, 2015's first half was fairly good. But economists see dangers lurking in the back half.
NPR

How Salt + Car Battery = Clean Water

A clever device uses technology developed by the military to make chlorine quickly and cheaply. The goal is to give schools and hospitals around the world an easy way to purify water.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.