: News

Frustrated Commuters Relieve Stress In D.C.

Play associated audio

By Jonathan Wilson

In downtown D.C. today, commuters got a chance to relieve stress and release anger over the region's notoriously bad traffic. The people behind the event say there's a more lasting solution to local commuter woes.

Frustrated commuters lined up in front of a car-shaped piñata outside the Reagan building, and most didn't hesitate to take their hardest swing.

Dozens of people took swings during their lunch breaks in downtown D.C. at an event called The Great Commuter Stress-Out.

Sarah Conway, a contractor working for the Department of Labor, took a few swats. She says her commute is usually the worst part of her day. "It's awful," says Conway. "I-95 North is the pits."

The event was put on by the Telework Exchange, a group that encourages people to let employees work from home. Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) took a few swings himself.
Connolly is co-sponsoring the Telework Improvement Act, a bill still making its way through Congress. He says it will help 20 percent of government workers in the D.C. area work from home by 2015.

"Twenty percent of the eligible workforce is eminently doable, and would make a big difference in the national capital region in terms of air pollution and congestion," says Connolly.

Telework proponents say if a fifth of government workers in the area teleworked, five to six percent fewer vehicles would be on local roads.

NPR

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.