Brother Of D.C. Sniper Victim Speaks About Muhammad Execution | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Brother Of D.C. Sniper Victim Speaks About Muhammad Execution

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By Elliott Francis

John Allen Muhammad, the so-called D.C. sniper, is expected to be put to death by lethal injection tonight. Bob Meyers, whose brother Dean was the seventh victim of the sniper attacks, plans to witness the execution.

Meyers remembers seeing the initial television reports of the latest sniper shooting back on the night of October 9th 2002, and the first clue that his brother Dean was the victim.

"I actually saw a glimpse of his black car but it never dawned on me that it was him," says Meyers. Dean was shot and killed at this gas station in Mannassas, Virginia.

Tiffany Brown often pumps gas there, and says she hasn't forgotten the trauma of the sniper attacks. "I feel comfortable here now, but a lot of times I do remember it even when I go to stations where he wasn't at," says Brown.

Myers will attend the execution, but says he will not get satisfaction in the result. "In spite of what has happened, it's still a very traumatic experience," says Myers.

The execution is scheduled for 9 o'clock tonight.

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