Afghan-American Pushes For Women's Rights | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Afghan-American Pushes For Women's Rights

Play associated audio
Nasrine Gross, the founder of an Afghan women's rights organization in Falls Church, Virginia, is using the recent presidential election in her home country to promote her cause.
PurposePrize.org
Nasrine Gross, the founder of an Afghan women's rights organization in Falls Church, Virginia, is using the recent presidential election in her home country to promote her cause.

By Rebecca Sheir

The founder of an Afghan women's rights organization in Falls Church, Virginia, is using the recent presidential election in her home country to promote her cause.

When Nasrine Gross isn't advocating for Afghan women's rights in Afghanistan, shes doing the same thing in the United States like at a recent panel discussion at the University of Maryland College Park.

For a husband to acknowledge that somebody is his wife is taboo," she says. "They sometimes call them, 'oh, my furniture' or 'the camel'."

Gross explains how, as a volunteer with the Abdullah Abdullah campaign, she was in charge of investigating fraud in eight provinces where, she says, "there were not even 100 women who went to vote, and yet there were hundreds of thousands of votes in their names for President Karzai. I am totally disgusted."

Gross seeks to encourage Afghan women to speak up for themselves. As founder of The Roquia Center in Falls Church, VA, she runs literacy programs in rural Afghanistan. But she'll only take married couples as pupils. She says it promotes peace at home and equality in society.

NPR

Lowly Worm Is Back! Richard Scarry Jr. Brings Dad's Manuscript To Life

The younger Scarry, also an illustrator, found a draft of Best Lowly Worm Book Ever! in his dad's Swiss chalet. He says all that was missing was the final art, "so that's what I did."
NPR

A Food Crisis Follows Africa's Ebola Crisis

Food shortages are emerging in the wake of West Africa's Ebola epidemic. Market shelves are bare and fields are neglected because traders can't move and social gatherings are discouraged.
WAMU 88.5

McDonnell Corruption Trial: Former Gov Defends Relationship With Jonnie Williams

On the stand today, the former Virginia governor defended his relationship with the businessman at the heart of the trial, saying it was appropriate.
NPR

New Camouflage Material Is A Color-Change Artist

Researchers say they've produced octopus-inspired materials that can sense color and change accordingly. NPR's Scott Simon talks to John Rogers, professor of engineering at the University of Illinois.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.