Opponents Of Gay Marriage In D.C. Cheer Results In Maine | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Opponents Of Gay Marriage In D.C. Cheer Results In Maine

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Opponents of same-sex marriage in D.C. are cheering the results of a ballot measure in Maine. Voters in Maine overturned a law allowing marriage for same-sex couples. Pastor Harry Jackson is fighting to put a similar measure on the ballot in D.C.

"It energizes us because of the vast amount of money that was spent in Maine, the way our opponents mobilized themselves from around the country to fight," said Jackson. "They've been doing the same thing in D.C. but still, that voice of the people was heard and that voice prevailed."

In June, the district's Board of Elections ruled a referendum on same-sex marriage would violate the city's Human Rights Act. The board is expected to rule on a second attempt this month. Some supporters of gay marriage say they are confident the board will reject it.

"Comparing Maine to D.C. is a bit of a stretch because D.C. does have a clear policy that it will not put something on the ballot that would allow discrimination," says Sultan Shakir, a field director with the Human Rights Campaign.

The D.C. Council is expected to vote on a same-sex marriage bill this month.

Patrick Madden reports...

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