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First Lady Presents Award To D.C. Non-Profits

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Michelle Obama, presenting the 2009 Coming Up Taller Award at the White House.
Sitar Arts Center
Michelle Obama, presenting the 2009 Coming Up Taller Award at the White House.

First Lady Michelle Obama has presented two local non-profits with a national award for their work on behalf of inner-city youth and their families.

The Sitar Arts Center and a group called Higher Achievement are being recognized with the 2009 "Coming Up Taller Award."

Obama hosted members of both groups at a White House ceremony. The award is given for outstanding out-of-school and after-school arts and humanities programs.

Young artists with the Sitar Center aren't strangers to the White House, they've performed there before. The center has been in Washington for 10 years, reporting a 40 percent increase in enrollment since 2007.

Brion Tillman-Young, a scholar with "Higher Achievement," ignored the strict White House rules to walk across the stage and say "thank you" to Mrs. Obama. Instead, Tillman-Young sprinted across the stage for a First Lady-style hug.

Each group will receive $10,000 and an invitation to attend a national leadership conference.

Stephanie Kaye reports...

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