Controversial Suspension Of Star High School Running Back Overturned | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Controversial Suspension Of Star High School Running Back Overturned

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A controversial suspension for a star Northern Virginia high school football has been overturned.

Broad Run High School's star running back T.J. Peeler was penalized twice during last week's game against Potomac Falls for chest bumping teammates after scoring touchdowns.

Two unsportsmanlike conduct penalties mean an automatic ejection, and Peeler would have missed the next game for the defending state champions as well if the decision had been upheld.

Northern Virginia Football Officials Commissioner Dennis Hall said the chest bump has become the high five for a new generation. "If it's a spontaneous chest bump, that's fine," said Hall. "What you don't want is where three or four of them do hand signals and do a choreographed thing."

Despite the reversal of Peeler's suspension, Hall said he doesn't mind if northern Virginia is getting a reputation for enforcing the rules strictly.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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