: News

Arlington Moves Toward Vaccinating First Graders Against H1N1

Play associated audio
First-graders in Arlington, Virginia could start getting school-wide H1N1 vaccinations as early as this Friday.
Centers for Disease Control
First-graders in Arlington, Virginia could start getting school-wide H1N1 vaccinations as early as this Friday.

First-graders in Arlington, Virginia could start getting school-wide H1N1 vaccinations as early as this Friday. That's something that's been on hold as the county health department deals with the vaccine shortage.

Congressman Jim Moran, of Arlington, said he's heard complaints about the vaccine shortage, but he said there's also a shortage of communication that's made getting a shot confusing. "Some parents let me know their particular elementary school didn't have the vaccine and there was one school that had an actual epidemic, and yet they didn't have the vaccine available," said Moran.

Arlington's public health director says the county has the doses needed to start vaccinating in schools as early as Friday. They'll start with first-graders, then move up to higher grades. Consent forms went out in October, and federal health leaders are now explaining to Congress the reason for the delay.

"With 20-20 hindsight, it's clear we should have been more skeptical about the projections being made," said Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Frieden says the H1N1 flu virus spreads quickly among the public, but grows slowly in the lab.

Megan Hughes reports...

NPR

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.