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Young Adults In D.C. "Get Hitched" Later Than Peers

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It could be their careers, their love of the single-life or something else, but young adults in D.C. are getting married later in life than their peers nationwide.
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It could be their careers, their love of the single-life or something else, but young adults in D.C. are getting married later in life than their peers nationwide.

It could be their careers, their love of the single-life or something else, but young adults in D.C. are getting married later in life than their peers nationwide.

Thirty-year-old Lindsay Harrison of Northwest D.C. is just now thinking about marriage. "Until a year or so ago, I was all about, always knew I wanted to go to graduate school, get my MBA, wanted to do this, that and the other thing with my career, and it isn't until probably recently that I'm like, ok--is this what I really wanted to do?" said Harrison.

Lindsay is not alone, she's actually part of the norm. A Pew Research Center study shows 30 as the median age for women in the District to get hitched. For men, it's 32. That's four years older than the national average for their respective groups.

Kristin Maiorano reports...

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