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Leaders Say Young People Still Politically Active

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Last year, young Americans showed up in record numbers to vote and even though turnout was lower for Tuesday's elections, several youth leaders say that doesn't mean there is less interest in politics.
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Last year, young Americans showed up in record numbers to vote and even though turnout was lower for Tuesday's elections, several youth leaders say that doesn't mean there is less interest in politics.

Last year, young Americans showed up in record numbers to vote and even though turnout was lower for Tuesday's elections, several youth leaders say that doesn't mean there is less interest in politics.

Deputy Director of Campus Progress Erica Williams says young people are staying involved in ways that go beyond voting, "Young people have been coordinating rallies across the nation on issues like health care. They've stayed involved, they've they've done photo petitions and lobbied their representatives and elected officials. The activity has continued, it's just a little bit more challenging."

Rock the Vote President Heather Smith says if politicians make sure young people are informed and also registered to vote they'll see the results of those efforts at the polls.

Kristin Maiorano reports...

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