: News

Filed Under:

Leaders Say Young People Still Politically Active

Play associated audio
Last year, young Americans showed up in record numbers to vote and even though turnout was lower for Tuesday's elections, several youth leaders say that doesn't mean there is less interest in politics.
www.flickr.com/Theresa Thompson
Last year, young Americans showed up in record numbers to vote and even though turnout was lower for Tuesday's elections, several youth leaders say that doesn't mean there is less interest in politics.

Last year, young Americans showed up in record numbers to vote and even though turnout was lower for Tuesday's elections, several youth leaders say that doesn't mean there is less interest in politics.

Deputy Director of Campus Progress Erica Williams says young people are staying involved in ways that go beyond voting, "Young people have been coordinating rallies across the nation on issues like health care. They've stayed involved, they've they've done photo petitions and lobbied their representatives and elected officials. The activity has continued, it's just a little bit more challenging."

Rock the Vote President Heather Smith says if politicians make sure young people are informed and also registered to vote they'll see the results of those efforts at the polls.

Kristin Maiorano reports...

NPR

Woody Allen's 'Fading Gigolo' Full Of Loneliness And Longing

In the new comedy Fading Gigolo, John Turturro plays the title character, and Woody Allen plays his pimp. This story originally broadcast on All Things Considered on April 18, 2014.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.