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Greenbelt Elects First Black City Council Member

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The city of Greenbelt has elected its first ever black city council member. Greenbelt residents cast more than 1,800 votes for Emmett Jordan.
www.jordanforgreenbelt.org
The city of Greenbelt has elected its first ever black city council member. Greenbelt residents cast more than 1,800 votes for Emmett Jordan.

The city of Greenbelt has elected its first ever black city council member. Greenbelt residents cast more than 1,800 votes for Emmett Jordan.

Only incumbent Mayor Judith Davis received more votes. That means Jordan becomes not only the city's first African-American councilman, but also likely its Mayor Pro Tem after the council holds an internal vote on November 9th.

Earlier this year, Greenbelt's city council altered its charter, creating two more seats on the council in an effort to increase voter turnout and diversity among city leaders.

The move came after criticism from the NAACP about the Greenbelt city council's historic lack of minority representation; the city's population is nearly 50 percent black.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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