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Cuccinelli Wins Big, Worries Some Democrats

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Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli's Traid program fights elderly injustice.
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Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli's Traid program fights elderly injustice.

State Senator Ken Cuccinelli represented Fairfax County in the General Assembly, and he was known as one of the most conservative legislators in commonwealth.

He is now the Virginia's Attorney General-elect.

In his victory speech last night, Cuccinelli said he'll use his new position forcefully.

"We're coming into office with a mandate from the people of Virginia to alter the course of change in Virginia," he told supporters in Richmond.

The conservative rhetoric makes some Democrats uneasy. David Bulova is a Democrat from Fairfax County who serves in the House of Delegates. He says Cuccinelli needs to think bipartisan when he takes office.

"With the Attorney General's position, it's important when you get elected that you're not just out there representing the 55 or 60 percent of the people out there who voted for you," Bulova says.

Cuccinelli's Democratic opponent, former state senator Steve Shannon, says he wants to work with Cuccinelli on combating gangs and stopping child predators.

David Schultz reports...

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