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"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Monday, November 2, 2009

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(October 30) AMERICAN CASINO A new film imagines Wall Street as a gambling hall in American Casino during a one-week run at the AFI Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Maryland. Filmed throughout 2008, the movie critically examines the foreclosure crisis and stars insiders from Wall Street, embattled homeowners from the heart of Baltimore and the man who made $500 million as a result of the crisis. The filmmakers will be on hand for tonight's 7 o'clock screening.

(Through November 6) CAPITOL HILL ART LEAGUE It's ladies-only at the Capitol Hill Art League during the All Media Show on display through Friday. This art co-op brings together the creators and the public to sample and discuss a new and wide variety of works.

(November 2) NAME THAT TUNE You've heard the names Mozart, Beethoven and Bach, but can you identify their music from a radio line-up? If not, The Music Center at Strathmore will teach you how to identify the different periods of classical music during Mondays in the Mansion this morning at 11. From "Opera in an Hour"" to "Name that Tune," music teacher and New Zealand native Aniko Debreceny helps strike a chord between what you hear and who you know.

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