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"Street Smart" Gets Its Start In Georgetown

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The D.C. region is starting its annual campaign to bring awareness to pedestrian safety. The "Street Smart" campaign kicked off with help from D.C.'s transportation department, handing out pamphlets to people on the streets in Georgetown.

George Branyan coordinates the department's Pedestrian Program. "It started as an idea from Montgomery County originally. And then we realized simply doing something on a one-county level was simply not going to get at the problem, which is we have drivers and pedestrians in three major jurisdictions. We needed an overall regional campaign."

Although the city is trying to reach walkers and bicyclists with its message, in the end it's drivers who are the focus. "Cyclists and pedestrians don't have a steel safety cage. They don't have airbags and all the safety features. They're very vulnerable. So it really does fall to the driver in the end to do the right thing."

In D.C., drivers who do not yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk could face a $250 fine and three points against their license.

Stephanie Kaye reports...


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