: News

Filed Under:

"Street Smart" Gets Its Start In Georgetown

Play associated audio

The D.C. region is starting its annual campaign to bring awareness to pedestrian safety. The "Street Smart" campaign kicked off with help from D.C.'s transportation department, handing out pamphlets to people on the streets in Georgetown.

George Branyan coordinates the department's Pedestrian Program. "It started as an idea from Montgomery County originally. And then we realized simply doing something on a one-county level was simply not going to get at the problem, which is we have drivers and pedestrians in three major jurisdictions. We needed an overall regional campaign."

Although the city is trying to reach walkers and bicyclists with its message, in the end it's drivers who are the focus. "Cyclists and pedestrians don't have a steel safety cage. They don't have airbags and all the safety features. They're very vulnerable. So it really does fall to the driver in the end to do the right thing."

In D.C., drivers who do not yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk could face a $250 fine and three points against their license.

Stephanie Kaye reports...

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
NPR

At The Democratic Convention, Choreographing A Sea Of Signs

Watch even a few minutes and you're bound to see some synchronized sign-holding — brightly colored placards with slogans like "Stronger Together" waving in the crowd.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.