: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Clergy Leaders Rally To Support Gay Marriage

Play associated audio
Asbury United Methodist Church is one of the oldest black churches in Washington and last night dozens of religious leaders packed the congregations wooden pews. They were there to support the Districts proposal to let same-sex couples marry.
Sandy Adams, Outdoorvizions Photography
Asbury United Methodist Church is one of the oldest black churches in Washington and last night dozens of religious leaders packed the congregations wooden pews. They were there to support the Districts proposal to let same-sex couples marry.

As the D.C. Council prepares to vote on legislation to allow same-sex marriage, a broad coalition of clergy members are rallying to support the measure. Asbury United Methodist Church is one of the oldest black churches in Washington and last night dozens of religious leaders packed the congregations wooden pews. They were there to support the Districts proposal to let same-sex couples marry.

As Robert Hardies, Reverend at the Unitarian All Souls Church pointed out from the pulpit, the group represents nearly every faith and background. They're known as D.C. Clergy United For Marriage Equality. Nearly 200 strong, the group wants to debunk the myth that the city's religious leaders are all lined up against gay marriage. The next public hearing on the same-sex marriage bill is scheduled for Monday at the Wilson Building.

Patrick Madden reports...

NPR

Not My Job: We Quiz Lena Headey On Games Worse Than 'Game Of Thrones'

Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We've invited Headey to play a game called "You win and you die."
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

TV ads are a tried-and-true way for politicians to get their message out. But in this chaotic presidential primary, are they still effective?
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.