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WASHINGTON (AP) Construction permits for the long-delayed Martin Luther King Junior Memorial were expected to be issued today. Organizers are celebrating the building phase of the monument for the National Mall and hope to finish construction in 2011.

WASHINGTON (AP) Showing exposed breasts on the air has been a TV taboo, but WJLA, an ABC afilliate in the Washington region, says they will not blur out the breasts of two volunteers who will participate in on-air clinical demonstrations of breast self-exams. The broadcasts will air today and tomorrow.

WASHINGTON (AP) A judge says the flight risk of a scientist accused of attempted espionage is too great to allow bail. Prosecutors say 52-year-old Stewart Nozette is accused of seeking $2 million for selling secrets to an undercover FBI agent posing as an Israeli intelligence officer.

WASHINGTON (AP) D.C. officials and a nonprofit group that operates a network of homes for the developmentally disabled have reached an agreement to improve the quality of its care. District officials announced the settlement with Individual Development Incorporated yesterday. The nonprofit faced the possibility of a court-ordered takeover of two of its 11 facilities.

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


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