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WASHINGTON (AP) Construction permits for the long-delayed Martin Luther King Junior Memorial were expected to be issued today. Organizers are celebrating the building phase of the monument for the National Mall and hope to finish construction in 2011.

WASHINGTON (AP) Showing exposed breasts on the air has been a TV taboo, but WJLA, an ABC afilliate in the Washington region, says they will not blur out the breasts of two volunteers who will participate in on-air clinical demonstrations of breast self-exams. The broadcasts will air today and tomorrow.

WASHINGTON (AP) A judge says the flight risk of a scientist accused of attempted espionage is too great to allow bail. Prosecutors say 52-year-old Stewart Nozette is accused of seeking $2 million for selling secrets to an undercover FBI agent posing as an Israeli intelligence officer.

WASHINGTON (AP) D.C. officials and a nonprofit group that operates a network of homes for the developmentally disabled have reached an agreement to improve the quality of its care. District officials announced the settlement with Individual Development Incorporated yesterday. The nonprofit faced the possibility of a court-ordered takeover of two of its 11 facilities.

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

NPR

'Kids Love To Be Scared': Louis Sachar On Balancing Fun And Fear

The award-winning author of Holes has just published a new novel for young readers, called Fuzzy Mud. It mixes middle-school social puzzles with a more sinister mystery: a rogue biotech threat.
NPR

Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well.
WAMU 88.5

How Artificial Intelligence And Robots Will Impact Jobs And How We Think About Work

Many experts say artificial intelligence and robots will displace jobs at a faster and faster pace over the coming decade. What changes in technology could mean for how we work.

WAMU 88.5

How Artificial Intelligence And Robots Will Impact Jobs And How We Think About Work

Many experts say artificial intelligence and robots will displace jobs at a faster and faster pace over the coming decade. What changes in technology could mean for how we work.

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