: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Native Awarded Congressional Gold Medal

Play associated audio
D.C. native Edward Brooke received a Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian award in the U.S.
www.flickr.com/talkradionews
D.C. native Edward Brooke received a Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian award in the U.S.

D.C. native Edward Brooke got a Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian award in the U.S. The former Republican Senator from Massachusetts was honored for his efforts in the struggle for voting rights in the nation's capital.

Brooke became the first African-American popularly elected to the Senate and served from 1967 to 1979. D.C. was where he was born and raised, and even stayed for college, so he fought for issues on its behalf. At a Capitol ceremony that included President Obama, Brooke urged the current Republican Senate leader to do something for people in need and put aside partisan politics.

"We can't worry about that Mitch McConnell," said Brooke. "We can't worry about those things. We can't worry that you all can't get together. We have got to get together. We have no alternative. There is nothing left."

Brooke also told lawmakers and others in attendance that he'd turn in his honor if Congress passes the D.C. voting rights bill. Brooke will turn 90 this week.

Sara Sciammacco reports...

NPR

Major Bambi: Meet The Marine Who Was Disney's Famous Fawn

A gritty Marine, Donnie Dunagan fought in the Vietnam War and earned decorations for his service. But all his life, there was one thing this commander could never escape: He was the voice of Bambi.
NPR

Humans Aren't The Only Ones To Go Ape Over Diets: Chimps Detox, Too

A group of Ugandan chimps has found a great way to boost their mineral intake and neutralize bitter compounds in their diet: by eating clay.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - July 31, 2015

Join us for our weekly review of the politics, policies, and personalities of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

NPR

In Michigan, A Testing Ground For A Future Of Driverless Cars

Automakers and researchers are using a 32-acre fake city at the University of Michigan to simulate a real-world environment for autonomous vehicles. How will such cars affect urban planning?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.