Students Appeal Suspension For Racist Symbols | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Students Appeal Suspension For Racist Symbols

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In Virginia, four students accused of arranging pieces of sod into racist symbols will appeal their school district's punishment at a disciplinary hearing tonight.

Six Stonewall Jackson High School students were suspended for using the sod to form a swastika and spell out "KKK" in a parking lot at Sinclair Elementary School in August. Prince William County Police say four students were charged with vandalism.

School board members will decide whether the four students be expelled for the rest of the year. Two of the suspended students are not appealing their punishment. Rae Roach, mother of two of the students, calls the punishment "unjust."

Roach tells the Washington Post her sons, 14 and 16 years old, completed a court-ordered program that included community service and a visit to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. She says they were humbled, "understanding now what those words and symbols mean to people."

Meymo Lyons reports...

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