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Maryland's Clean Current Energy Program

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If you're a resident of Maryland or D.C. and fed up with with high energy rates that fluctuate, there's a money saving alternative.

Matt Berres lives in a one bedroom home in Greenbelt Maryland. At first glance, there's nothing unusual about how he consumes energy until you get a look at his electricity bill. "Well compared to Pepco's summer rates, we're saving about 12 to 13 percent on our bill," said Berres.

Berres is enrolled in the Clean Currents energy program. Because of laws that allow customer choice in Maryland, Berres had the opportunity to switch their source of electricity from coal or nuclear, to wind generated power.

There aren't solar panels on the roof, or windmills in the backyard. The power comes in over the standard electrical grid, but it is where it's coming from that makes the difference, according to Kristi Neidhardt of Clean Currents.

"We get ours from wind farms across the country," said Berres. "As far as from Texas from California, yes it comes from all across the country."

This is the same level of service he's accustomed to. It's cheaper, greener and there are no surprises on his monthly bill. "With Clean Currents what I've done is sign a contract so I'm gonna be paying a flat rate for the contract period; no fluctuation, I know exactly what my bill's going to be."

Approximately 4,000 area residents are currently enrolled in the program.

Elliott Francis reports...

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