Congress Hears Testimony About Stimulus Impact in D.C. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Congress Hears Testimony About Stimulus Impact in D.C.

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Congress is taking stock of stimulus funds in the D.C. area. Lawmakers want to know if the money is creating new jobs.

Congress handed the District more than $500 million to make government buildings more green and give the Smithsonian a face lift. Stimulus funds are also helping fund the conversion of St. Elizabeths Hospital into the headquarters of the Department of Homeland Security.

Robert Peck represents the General Services Administration.

"St. E's will be the Washington metro area's largest federal construction project since the Pentagon," he says.

"It will revitalize and spur economic development in Anacostia and will feature green roofs, landscaped courtyards, and provisions to reuse surface water runoff."

Peck spoke at a hearing Tuesday led by D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton.

Smithsonian representatives say they are spending stimulus funds to update museums, the national zoo and ecological research centers.

Congressional Republicans say the stimulus hasn't created as many jobs as promised.

Tanya Snyder reports...

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