: News

"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, October 27, 2008

Play associated audio

(October 28 & November 16) AUTHOR TALKS The Shakespeare Theatre Company brings New York to D.C. with two live simulcasts, streaming a lecture and Q&A with author John Irving tomorrow night at 7 at the Harman Hall, and with Stephen King on November 16th at D.C.'s Lansburgh Theatre. You can email questions for the authors in advance of the high-tech talk, or speak with them during the broadcasts from The Times Center in New York City.

(October 27) WEARY BLUES & LANGSTON'S LEGACY Washington Musica Viva and poet Holly Bass bring The Weary Blues and Langston Hughes to life during a performance at St. Mary's Episcopal Church in D.C.'s Foggy Bottom tonight at 7. Bass and a few musical friends perform this original work of jazz and poetry honoring the collaboration between Langston Hughes and Charles Mingus.

(October 29 & 30) MARGARET JENKINS DANCE East meets West as two dance companies - China's Guangdong Modern and D.C.'s Margaret Jenkins - present Other Suns at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Thursday and Friday at 8pm. "Other Suns" explores place, communication and identity with dance that is both sensual and refined.

NPR

Not My Job: We Quiz Lena Headey On Games Worse Than 'Game Of Thrones'

Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We've invited Headey to play a game called "You win and you die."
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

TV ads are a tried-and-true way for politicians to get their message out. But in this chaotic presidential primary, are they still effective?
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.