"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, October 27, 2008 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, October 27, 2008

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(October 28 & November 16) AUTHOR TALKS The Shakespeare Theatre Company brings New York to D.C. with two live simulcasts, streaming a lecture and Q&A with author John Irving tomorrow night at 7 at the Harman Hall, and with Stephen King on November 16th at D.C.'s Lansburgh Theatre. You can email questions for the authors in advance of the high-tech talk, or speak with them during the broadcasts from The Times Center in New York City.

(October 27) WEARY BLUES & LANGSTON'S LEGACY Washington Musica Viva and poet Holly Bass bring The Weary Blues and Langston Hughes to life during a performance at St. Mary's Episcopal Church in D.C.'s Foggy Bottom tonight at 7. Bass and a few musical friends perform this original work of jazz and poetry honoring the collaboration between Langston Hughes and Charles Mingus.

(October 29 & 30) MARGARET JENKINS DANCE East meets West as two dance companies - China's Guangdong Modern and D.C.'s Margaret Jenkins - present Other Suns at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Thursday and Friday at 8pm. "Other Suns" explores place, communication and identity with dance that is both sensual and refined.

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 18

You can attend an annual Latin American film festival or see a new play about strength, war and family.

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From Coffee To Chicory To Beer, 'Bitter' Flavor Can Be Addictive

If you don't think you like bitter foods, try them again. Jennifer McLagan, the author of Bitter: A Taste Of The World's Most Dangerous Flavor, is on a mission to change hearts and minds.
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Most Of D.C. Region's Lawmakers Back Plan To Arm Syrian Rebels

The House has passed a bill that authorizes the arming of moderate rebel groups in Syria — it's a vote that most, though not all, local lawmakers supported.

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3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

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