"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, October 27, 2008 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" with Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, October 27, 2008

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(October 28 & November 16) AUTHOR TALKS The Shakespeare Theatre Company brings New York to D.C. with two live simulcasts, streaming a lecture and Q&A with author John Irving tomorrow night at 7 at the Harman Hall, and with Stephen King on November 16th at D.C.'s Lansburgh Theatre. You can email questions for the authors in advance of the high-tech talk, or speak with them during the broadcasts from The Times Center in New York City.

(October 27) WEARY BLUES & LANGSTON'S LEGACY Washington Musica Viva and poet Holly Bass bring The Weary Blues and Langston Hughes to life during a performance at St. Mary's Episcopal Church in D.C.'s Foggy Bottom tonight at 7. Bass and a few musical friends perform this original work of jazz and poetry honoring the collaboration between Langston Hughes and Charles Mingus.

(October 29 & 30) MARGARET JENKINS DANCE East meets West as two dance companies - China's Guangdong Modern and D.C.'s Margaret Jenkins - present Other Suns at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Thursday and Friday at 8pm. "Other Suns" explores place, communication and identity with dance that is both sensual and refined.

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'Language Of Food' Reveals Mysteries Of Menu Words And Ketchup

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Microsoft is buying the company that created the video game Minecraft, which has a loyal following in part because of the freedom it allows players — including freedom from pressure to buy add-ons.

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