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Washington DC: "Justia Omnibus" with Plenty of Jiggle

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Belladonna Wynkoop, left, watches a rehearsal video with members of the dance troupe Bellatrix.
Stephanie Kaye
Belladonna Wynkoop, left, watches a rehearsal video with members of the dance troupe Bellatrix.

Washington is well known for its politics. But some argue it's also making its mark in bellydancing, as Stephanie Kaye reports...

Belladonna Wynkoop has been teaching "fusion" style bellydancing for 15 years. She's hosting shows and workshops with a coalition of dance companies, attracting performers from around the country. "A lot of big cities have a decent cabaret scene -- that's what's traditionally known as belly dance. Just now, cities other than San Francisco are beginning to hold their own. D.C. is up there. We're an East Coast hub, for sure."

D.C. a belly dancing hub? That's a fact, says Wynkoop. She points to the influence of Washington's international residents. "Cabaret belly dance and traditional Raksharki was already very big here, I think because of the ethnic diversity of this area." This weekend's events, including dance workshops and the "D.C. Tribal Cafe," are being held in Adams Morgan and the U Street jazz district.

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