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Swine Flu May Be Nearing Peak in Virginia

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Virginia's health commissioner says the state may be seeing the peak of swine flu infection. Karen Remley says Virginia could be in the middle of its "epidemic curve," where a disease reaches its highest point of infection before starting to come down, measured by the number of cases seen in hospital emergency rooms. "We are up at 14.2 percent. When we look at other states that have gone through their influenza curves, they tend to hit somewhere between 14 and 16 percent and then start to come down."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the federal Department of Health and Human Services also are monitoring other countries, specifically Australia, to see if the H1N1 virus follows the typical infection pattern.

Remley says right now, Virginia is trying to vaccinate people who are at high risk of contracting the virus. "It will be interesting for us to see how getting vaccination out - even if it's in small numbers - might help us bring down that curve." But she says she expects to be able to make the vaccine available to the general public by mid-November. However, delays in production mean that date is a "moving target."

Stephanie Kaye reports...

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