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Some African Americans Skeptical of Flu Vaccines

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Hundreds of families in Wards six and seven lined up for their doses of the H1N1 flu vaccine last night, though some remain mistrustful.

Khepra Anu won't be getting a flu vaccination this year - or ever. He doesn't trust vaccine providers.

Howard University historian Greg Carr says a history of racist medical practices have left many African Americans skeptical. That is beginning to change though.

Dr. Pierre Vigelance is head of the D.C. Department of Health. He insists the risk of side effects from the flu vaccine is low, and says thousands have been safely vaccinated.

Free flu shots for vulnerable groups will be available in the District until mid November.

Jamila Bey reports...

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