: News

Filed Under:

Organizers Try to Green Marine Corps Marathon

Play associated audio

Tens of thousands will participate in the Marine Corps Marathon that meanders through DC and Northern Virginia Sunday. Race organizers say they're making sure to minimize its impact on the environment.

30,000 runners will surely affect the environment. Marathon runners throw extra clothing on the ground, along with empty cups and exhausted water bottles. But race planners say they're prepared for the cleanup, director Rick Nealis proudly touts the efforts he's making.

"Does the cost go up, sure?" he says. "There is a cost factor: a penny, two pennies, a dollar. But at the end, it's the right things to do."

He says two years ago organizers decided to make the environmental impact a major focus. Bruce Rayner, the man tasked with greening up the event, says the Marine Corps Marathon is leading the way in hosting environmentally friendly sporting events.

"They're firing on many cylinders, the waste, the climate. They're promoting health among youth," he says.

His goal is to recycle at least 50 percent of the waste produced. He says people will gather more than eight-hundred-fifty-thousand cups and send them to a commercial composter in Maryland.

Peter Granitz reports...

NPR

Not My Job: Sharon Jones Gets Quizzed On Handshakes

We've invited the lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings to play a game called "Let's shake on it."
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

Barbershop: Speechwriters Speak On The RNC And DNC

Republican speechwriter Mary Kate Cary, Democratic speechwriter Jeff Nussbaum and historian from the University of Virginia Barbara Perry dissect the last two weeks of speeches at the RNC and DNC.
NPR

From 'The Water's Edge To The Cutting Edge': Fish Skeletons, CT Scans And Engineering

Professor Adam Summers is a "fish guy." He uses fish to get engineering ideas. His latest project is to CT scan every type of fish — all 33,000 of them.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.