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D.C. Metro Addresses Employee Discipline Issues

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With 400 citations for running red lights in 2004, Metro bus operators are in the spotlight, and so are the people they work for.

Bus operators watching television, texting behind the wheel, along with reports of rude behavior and frequent traffic accidents. That's just part of recent public reports on the conduct of some of the people who work for metro.

According to Metro spokesperson Lisa Farbstein, these workers are in the minority. "We've got 10,000 employees; the majority of employees do a great job every single day," said Farbstein. "You just tend not to hear that."

What is heard are the mounting reports which cast doubt on a system already troubled with crime and safety issues. Here's how Metro is tackling the problem, according to Farbstein: "We are currently reviewing our standard operating procedures, our disciplinary actions and changing our approach to discipline."

Worker's unions say they support Metro's ongoing discipline initiatives.

Elliott Francis reports...


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