Politicians Weigh Possibility of Regional Road Pricing Proposal | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Politicians Weigh Possibility of Regional Road Pricing Proposal

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There's a road pricing proposal under consideration which could cost motorists approximately eight to ten cents per mile to drive on the regions highways. It's a plan that could have political implications.

The idea, conceived by the Brookings Institution and under consideration by the region's transportation planners centers on a GPS based roadway pricing system.

The plan would charge motorists based on the distance they drive, the type of vehicle they drive and the level of congestion on the road. So far, at least one elected official, Fairfax city councilman Dan Drummond, is calling foul.

"I don't feel it's appropriate for the transportation planning board to be surveying individual jurisdictions or individual constituents on the issues of taxes and fees. That is our job as elected official to make those judgments," said Drummond.

With transportation emerging as one of the central debates in Virginia's race for Governor, some transportation analysts feel a road pricing proposal could develop into a hot button issue.

A study to gauge public support of the proposal is underway.

Elliott Francis reports...

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