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RICHMOND, Va. (AP) The Virginia Board of Education wants the state to set staffing levels for full-time teachers of special, gifted, and career and technical education. The board also supports establishing ratios for support staffers--which include social workers, school nurses, and clerical workers--but said further study is needed to determine the best way to approach the issue.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) Virginia game officials will take a closer look at a proposal to increase the size of a small herd of Rocky Mountain elk in the state's remote southwest corner. Officials decided today to size up an elk management plan.

BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP) Virginia Tech police are investigating written messages on YouTube that threaten a mass shooting at the university, but believe there is no direct threat to the school. A university spokesman says authorities believe the threats may have originated in Europe.

CHANTILLY, Va. (AP) Two committees of the Washington Metropolitan Airports Authority board have voted unanimously to increase rates on the Dulles Toll Road. Yesterday's vote was expected and comes over the objections of many commuters.

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


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