Md. Congresswoman: Budget Shortfalls Leave Abuse Victims Without Services | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Md. Congresswoman: Budget Shortfalls Leave Abuse Victims Without Services

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The bad economy is making it worse for domestic violence victims whose abuse stems from financial troubles. Maryland Democrat Donna Edward says funding shortfalls are leaving many women without the services they need.

Maryland police reported nearly 19,000 domestic violence cases last year. Prince George's and Montgomery counties had a total of nearly 4,000. While the numbers are down from the year before, Congresswoman Edwards says victims across the state and country aren't getting enough help with housing, mental and legal issues.

"A lot of shelters and domestic violence services and programs are funded by a combination of federal, state, local and private dollars and we are in an economic environment in which a lot of that funding is just disappearing and that has had a tremendous impact," said Edwards.

Edwards chairs a congressional task force that's working on combating domestic violence. Experts say increased resources and education will help financially abused victims leave relationships and stand on their own two feet.

Sara Sciammacco reports...

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