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H1N1 Vaccine Production Delay Forces Counties To Change Plans

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In Virginia, many Fairfax County residents hoping to get H1N1 shots this coming weekend will have to wait a little longer, because of delays in vaccine production.

The county had planned vaccination clinics in ten Fairfax County middle schools for Saturday and Sunday and had hoped to dispense more than 40,000 doses of the vaccine.

Now Fairfax County Health Director Gloria Addo-Ayensu says her department is only counting on having 10,000 doses by this weekend, and instead of ten clinics, will hold a single mass vaccination on Saturday for pregnant women and young children 6 to 36 months old.

"We'll be offering vaccine to a much smaller group, but nonetheless a significant group that we know is at high-risk of complications from H1N1," says Dr. Addo-Ayensu.

The mass vaccination clinic runs from 9 am to 5 pm on Saturday and will be held at the Fairfax County Government Center.

Jonathan Wilson reports...

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