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    Appeals Court Won't Reconsider Checkpoints Ruling

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    A federal appeals court has refused to reconsider its decision that police checkpoints in a troubled Washington neighborhood were unconstitutional. The city had asked for a hearing before the entire court after a three-judge panel struck down the operation in the Trinidad neighborhood.

    Last year, D.C. police stopped cars in the area, refusing to let in motorists who didn't prove they lived in the area or reveal their destinations. A civil liberties group sued on behalf of three drivers.

    D.C. Attorney General Peter Nickles says he is considering two options: taking the case to the U.S. Supreme Court or modifying the program and creating, what he calls, checkpoints "2".

    "And that is a checkpoint which would be effective and comply with what the D.C. Circuit decided," said Nickles.

    The city has 90 days to file a petition with the U.S. Supreme Court.

    Patrick Madden reports...

    NPR

    'Dragonfish' Offers A Noir Vision Of An 'American Dream Gone Rancid'

    The debut novel by Vu Tran is a crime drama involving a white cop, his Vietnamese-born ex-wife and her new husband, a violent crime boss. Maureen Corrigan calls Dragonfish a "haunting literary novel."
    NPR

    How New Jersey Tamed The Wild Blueberry For Global Production

    In the past 10 years, the global blueberry crop has tripled. Yet the big, round commercial blueberry is a fairly recent innovation. It was created by breeders exactly 100 years ago, in New Jersey.
    NPR

    Just How Arbitrary Is Fox's 10-Person GOP Debate Cutoff?

    The top 10 candidates, as determined by Fox's analysis of polls, will debate Thursday. But even when you average polls together, it's tough to tell the difference between the lower-ranked hopefuls.
    NPR

    Sexist Reactions To An Ad Spark #ILookLikeAnEngineer Campaign

    After being surprised by online responses to her appearance in a recruiting ad, engineer Isis Wenger wanted to see if there anyone else felt like they didn't fit a "cookie-cutter mold."

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