Obama Surprises Maryland Elementary Students With Visit | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

Obama Surprises Maryland Elementary Students With Visit

Play associated audio

President Barack Obama made a surprise visit to a Maryland school today to offer encouragement and congratulations.

Mr. Obama stopped by Viers Mill Elementary School outside Washington, where he met with third- and fourth-grade students during their lunch period. The school receives federal poverty aid and has been celebrated for closing the achievement gap between minority children and other students.

Viers Mill Principal Matt Devan says the President made his way through the cafeteria, shaking hands with students and asking them what they were reading. Devan says Obama also offered some students advice on their fledgling political careers.

"A couple of our students running for student council asked him for some advice on how to get elected," Devan says. "I thought that was a pretty special moment." Obama said he came to Viers Mill because it is "a great example of how much improvement a school can make."

Jonathan Wilson reports...

NPR

Christmas Bells Are Ringing, And Cable Holiday Movies Are Unrelenting

Christmas cable movies are a genre unto themselves. We take a look at some of the Hallmark (and other) romances that are surprisingly big business this time of year.
NPR

Coca-Cola Wades Into Milk Business With 'Fairlife'

The milk is now for sale in a limited number of stores — including the Coborn's in Belle Plaine, Minn. Ari Shairo talks with Coborn's dairy manager, Steven Thueringer.
WAMU 88.5

Forthcoming MoCo Legislation Targets Smoking, Alcohol, Pinball

The start of Maryland's General Assembly session is a little less than two months away, but state lawmakers are already crafting bills that propose certain alcohol and tobacco regulations. And pinball.
NPR

In Darren Wilson's Testimony, Familiar Themes About Black Men

Wilson's descriptions of Michael Brown reminded some people of negative depictions of African-Americans in history. Recent studies suggest these perceptions have deeper psychological roots.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.